Enfield

Where ever you live in the UK from the far north to your location and all the way to the south, energy suppliers are a constant cause of stress and financial drain. We all want to pay less for our energy but with costs and tariffs changing all the time, it can be very difficult to make the right decision. This page will point you in the right direction for help in Enfield and much more.

When people are looking for ways to reduce expenses or make better use of their money, they often look at common household expenses like utilities, subscriptions and even those associated with entertainment and recreation. The biggest monthly outgoing is usually food and energy bills.

In order to get the best gas and electricity deals available you need to understand how the gas and electricity suppliers are set up and how they calculate your bills. Many people don’t have a clue about the structure of the utility market in the UK and as a consequence end up spending way over the odds for their heating and lighting.

If you are looking for a better deal on your utilities then it’s pretty likely you were not too happy with your last bill. Especially in these tough economic times, you need to make sure you are not paying more than you have to. Just recently there have been further reports in the press of how the wholesale price of fuels is coming down yet the suppliers are not passing on these savings to their customers.

The easiest way to find the best gas and electricity for your area is to use a price comparison website, this takes all the guesswork, sales hype and confusion out of the process and lets your quickly see who can give you a better deal. I have consistently found energylinx to get the best prices and I would recommend you check them out. Utility bills often have a high monthly price, and reducing your spending on this can mean having more money that you can allocate toward other things.

You might also want to consider downsizing your lawn by using more hard surfaces to reduce electricity use with your lawnmower. Or perhaps you use a timer for your winter heating when leaving the heat on at a low level has been shown to reduce consumption. Cooking individual meals for families that could eat together is also an energy waste that can be recovered. Installing solar panels can produce energy for use in your home but the amount generated and the saving made depends on the position of your home and the time scale you need to recover the initial outlay. New smart meters claim to save you money by making you more aware of the energy you consume each day. However, these are not available everywhere in the country and there have been some issues with the technology.

After covering saving energy used for cooking and heating water in your home or office, we can make the transition to reducing the amount of electricity used for refrigeration, washing and lighting. Remember, up to 25% of total energy consumption in a home comes from these three areas. But don’t feel overwhelmed. Here are a few easy to implement strategies that can save on energy bills going forward.

Start With Heating.

The lowest cost method for reducing consumption is utilising programmable thermostats. Every degree that you adjust by equal a 4–5% reduction in energy usage for that system. Also, don’t forget to program thermostats to turn on and off at the proper times and you will begin to see a reduction in usage. Add strip curtains and automatic door closers to walks ins and Installing ECM’s on evaporator and condenser fans can reduce usage by approximately 2/3rds. On the lighting side, you have options as well. Start by adding occupancy sensors in select areas such as closets, storage rooms, staff bathrooms, etc. Also adding high-efficiency LED bulbs can reduce lighting consumption by up to 50%. Many utilities will cover a percentage (my local utility covers up to 70%) of the cost to purchase the bulbs, significantly improving ROI.

By implementing these simple strategies we have covered, you are well on your way to energy savings by reducing consumption which is a key element in any energy management plan.

electricity gas no standing charge

Energy Saving Tips

If the Government is ever to meet its legally-binding target for 12 per cent of the UK’s heat to come from low-carbon or renewable sources, district heating will play an integral role. Yet district heating currently represents a minuscule fraction of the UK energy sector, with only 210,000 homes and 1,700 businesses currently connected. This stands in stark contrast to other countries like Sweden, Denmark, Germany and South Korea where a far higher proportion of people receive their heat via such networks.

If operated effectively, there is no doubt district heating schemes can be more efficient, lower cost and emit less carbon dioxide than gas or other alternative heating models. However, there is a real risk that the environmental benefits of district heating are being obscured by a very real perception among consumers that they do not offer a fair deal.

At least six district heating schemes currently operate in my constituency of Greenwich and Woolwich at New Capital Quay, The Movement, Greenwich Square in East Greenwich, Greenwich Millennium Village (GMV) on the Peninsula, Woolwich Central on Love Lane and Royal Arsenal Riverside in Woolwich. A fifth is to follow at Enderby Wharf in East Greenwich. Over the past five months I have amassed a bulky file of correspondence from constituents who are served by these networks and who believe that they are being unfairly charged and that there is a lack of transparency about what is covered in their bills.

The UK district heating market is still in its infancy and so low levels of consumer confidence might be expected. What exacerbates the low levels of consumer confidence in this area is the absence of consumer choice. If district heating customers enjoyed the same freedom of choice that others on the grid do they could respond to concerns over pricing and transparency by switching supplier. Instead, they are locked to monopolies from which there is no escape.

The current state of affairs cries out for effective statutory regulation. The most recent consultation on district heating regulation occurred in 2014 and little appears to have moved on since the Government’s initial decision not to regulate the market on the basis that it would drive investment in the sector by avoiding red tape.

District heating suppliers have sought to build trust and confidence in the market by establishing the Heat Trust, an initiative sponsored by the Association for Decentralised Energy (ADE). Given the levels of consumer mistrust that now exist this industry-led approach can only ever be an interim solution. First, the voluntary nature of the Trust does not guarantee universal coverage for all district heating consumers. Second, it will do little to reassure customers that the market operates on the basis of fair and consistent pricing, particularly when one considers that the Heat Trust’s pricing formula is benchmarked to gas networks that utilise very different technologies. Third, it is not an adequate substitute for the redress provided by a sector Ombudsman.

If we are to effectively protect district heat customers and build confidence in a market where future success is crucial to the UK meeting its legally binding targets on low-carbon heat, the Government needs to look seriously at introducing effective regulation of the industry, and quickly.

Saving More On Energy Costs For Residents of Enfield

electricity and gas location enquiry system

How Can Small Businesses Save on Their Energy?

Let's talk about the top 5 fuel efficient cars for snow and how this may save you some money as well as a trip into the ditch. The time is upon us, that time of year where you head out to go to work and you find a foot of new snow in your drive way. This heeds warning as to what the road conditions are going to be for the rest of your trip.

You want to be prepared to tackle the drive through the snow this winter.

If you are concerned about your vehicle getting you through the wintry conditions this article will shed some light on good winter vehicles that can help make your destination on time and safe.

If you are concerned that the vehicle you do have is going to cost you an arm and a leg to travel through the snowy mess, this article will help you decide on a car that will endure the treacherous drive as well as save you a little money on fuel.

And, finally here is a compact car that can do the job...

Suzuki Sx4 - This car offers the AWD feature that is a beautiful thing if you will be driving on slippery, snowy road conditions. Not all compact cars offer this feature so this makes the Suzuki Sx4 a beauty when it comes to winter conditions. The extreme handling and the strong engine will help you plow through the snow. The AWD feature will get you 20 mpg in the city and 29 across the highway.

When looking for the top 5 fuel efficient cars for snow, this is a great list to start with that will help make your travels easier as well as save you a few bucks on fuel.

If your local Utility company is one of the big six energy suppliers you probably aren’t getting the best deal possible. Most of the cheaper tariffs are offered by smaller, often unfamiliar companies. These are typically hidden or don’t feature prominently on the major energy comparison websites that compare the market.

Top Ten Energy Saving Tips and Ideas

(A little from each one of us means a lot for our planet).

Today there are various ways to help save our planet and generate our own electricity. Wind power, solar power and so on. The information is readily available all around the globe. Many countries have great incentives and power companies will buy the energy you produce but one thing is for sure: you have to make the initial investment yourself, whether it's through a loan or from your own savings. It is one of the best investments today and the payback period is relatively short.

But there are many ways that we can save on our energy costs within our own home without spending a dime:

Here are some great energy saving tips:

Replace Incandescent Bulbs - Old fashioned, incandescent bulbs are a huge money waster, both in energy and in the cost of the bulbs. Modern fluorescent bulbs can last up to 5 years and use a fraction of the energy. If you're aiming for even bigger savings, go with LED light bulbs, which can last twenty-five times longer than incandescent bulbs and use even less energy than fluorescents.

Unplug Your Devices - Most people figure that when they hit the power button, their appliance or electronic stops sucking juice from the wall. Unfortunately, it doesn't really work like that. Electricity may not be flowing and getting consumed, but it is very much being used. So, don't just turn your devices off, unplug them when not in use.

Turn Off Lights - This is a simple one that you've likely heard since you were ten years old. Turn the lights off when not in the room. I'll do it one further. Turn them off at all times unless you specifically need that light to do something.

Use Power Strips to Control Use - Use power strips on every outlet that you can. They not only reduce direct energy use, they allow you to turn off the power being used without having to unplug every appliance individually. It's also a good idea to have power strips to avoid surges that can harm your devices.

Don't Idle Your Car Unnecessarily - Idling a car wastes gasoline. Most cars can be warmed up by driving them. Instead of sitting in your car and idling without moving, drive it to warm it up while not on the highway. Additionally, avoid city streets whenever possible to improve gas mileage.

Tune Up Your Car Regularly - Regular tune ups and oil changes in your car will improve gas mileage and reduce the need for costly repairs. Even if you have a new car with no problems, make sure you stick to your regular maintenance schedule to reduce potentially massive bills.

Reduce Weight in the Car - Take out any unnecessary weight from your trunk or back seat. Extra weight reduces gas mileage and slows your car down, also putting a heavier burden on the engine which can cost you later.

Have Your Home Inspected - Have someone take a look at your home to find any leaks, insulation problems, old wiring, or other energy wasting issues. Many times, energy draining issues can be masked by walls, flooring, or a simple lack of knowledge. Look for an impartial third party that won't try to sell you on unnecessary repairs.

Lucy Symons, Director of Public Policy at Open Energi calls on policy makers to make regulation fit for purpose

This winter, the UK is expecting high demand for electricity supply and an increase in costs. Renewable power sources are starting to fill the gap left behind by closing coal power stations, but they generate more when the sun shines or the wind blows and are not necessarily available when people turn on their televisions in the evenings.

National Grid pays gas and coal plants and diesel farms to turn up or down their supply whenever there’s an increase or decrease in demand for electricity. This winter alone, keeping power plants going for peak demand is forecast to cost consumers £122 million, while an estimated £800 million in subsidies may be awarded to diesel projects under the Government’s Capacity Market. This is expensive, slow and not very green. Energy prices and security of supply are top political priorities, but when it takes four years and a lot of money to build a power station, there needs to be a more efficient solution.

The good news is that Great Britain has a thriving energy technology sector with a vast portfolio of innovations that can step up to this immediate challenge. Open Energi, a dynamic UK tech firm, uses technology to link together more than 3,000 machines — like air conditioners in your local supermarket or the pumps moving our water — and switches these machines on or off during the day to make power available when it’s needed by consumers, or to store electricity after a big gust of wind. This technology is already installed at over 350 industrial and commercial sites across the UK including Sainsbury’s, Tarmac, Aggregate Industries, United Utilities and University of East Anglia. Developed right here in Britain, this is powerful technology. On cold winter evenings, it can function just like an entire nuclear plant. Demand flexibility is the first line of defence in an energy security crisis, which is characterised by successive power plant failures rather than a lack of supply.

But this ‘demand-side’ energy tech faces major barriers in UK energy markets. Companies like Open Energi cannot prequalify for the government Capacity Market and cannot compete directly against gas plants in the balancing mechanism. The fast, flexible power they provide is instead only accessible via monthly tenders and procurements. Faced with a national energy security crunch on one hand and with the tech needed to solve it bound only by markets that aren’t fit for purpose, there is an immediate opportunity to unleash competition. Unlike other energy projects, demand flexibility requires no state subsidy at all. All that we ask at Open Energi is that the regulations are updated to ensure ‘demand side’ (when we turn demand up and down) is given the same treatment as ‘supply side’ (when new power is generated) in the existing energy markets.

Deploying demand flexibility and storage at speed to solve an energy crunch at scale is a proven path. In 2015, Californian policymakers were faced with a shutdown at the state’s biggest gas storage facility, threatening peak shortages and blackouts. To solve this immediate challenge with an immediately available solution, policy-makers fast-tracked 64.5MW of electricity storage and approved $11.5 million for demand response and dynamic pricing. Energy storage projects were constructed in less than four months, compared to a previous average of three and a half years.

Applying the same market mechanisms in the UK could dramatically change the game for energy security on the GB grid as early as next winter. With over 1GW of energy storage prequalified for National Grid’s recent Enhanced Frequency Response tender, of which only 200MW was purchased, it’s clear we have the appetite from investors to bring innovation to market. The challenge now rests with policy makers to make regulation fit for purpose in a modern age of energy technology innovation.

Lucy Symons is the Director of Public Policy for @openenergi and recently travelled to California as part of a delegation of female founders leading some of the UK’s fastest growing tech firms.